Frederick Palmer was a designer, craftsman and builder who brought his business to WGC in 1924. He is listed as an established builder in C.B.Purdom's 2nd edition of 'The Building of Satellite Towns' published in 1949 which also notes that the WGC Ltd company's 'leasehold system of land tenure, which did not provide scope for land speculation by builders or their financiers, prevented builders from operating in the town except to a limited extent'. In the WGC Directory of 1953-4 Frederick Palmer's advertisement states that he carries out work 'from foundations to furniture' as he undertook woodworking commissions as well as building work.

Frederick Palmer
Elmwood postcard - this housing was built by Fred Palmer and decorated with his trademark brick mosaics. Postcard from the Mill Green Museum archive.
Frederick Palmer
Fred Palmer - builder of many WGC Homes - advertisement that appeared in the Welwyn Times newspaper of 29th November 1928 (page 14). Item donated to the Welwyn Garden City Heritage Trust archive during the 'Where Do You Think You Live?' project.
Frederick Palmer
WGC official handbook & directory for 1953-54. Pages 92-93 Frederick Palmer advertisement and information. It states that Mr Palmer brought his business to WGC in 1924. The Free Church, WGC and 'many private houses are examples of his fine brickwork' also mentioned are the woodwork - lecterns, tables and more that were supplied to the Free Church and St. Francis' Church. Item donated to the Welwyn Garden City Heritage Trust by Ken W as part of the 'Where Do You Think We Worked?' project.
Frederick Palmer
Examples of the brick mosaics that decorate WGC housing built by Fred Palmer. In those days of timber scaffolding bricks were left out of the walls at intervals to take the ends of the putlogs - the short horizontal timbers on which the scaffold-boards rested - and as the scaffolding was "struck" the putlog holes were filled each with a single brick except on Fred Palmer's buildings. He filled each putlog hole with a varying pattern - a "mosaic" - of tile chips, evidence of a craftsman's pride and joy in his work.
 
 
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